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Spine Care & Treatment Info

  • Scoliosis treatment might reduce need for surgeries

    SourceUS News Health

    Scoliosis is an abnormal curving of the spine that occurs mainly in young children and adolescents. Traditional treatment for children who are still growing is surgical insertion of growing rods. Every six months, however, a new surgery is required to lengthen the rods.

    In the study, researchers assessed the use of magnetically controlled growing rods that were implanted in two patients. The key advantage: Surgery is not required to lengthen these rods.

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  • Surgery less than 24 hours after cervical spinal cord injury yields improved outcomes

    SourceOrthosupersite

    Researchers at the Rothman Institute at Jefferson have found that patients who receive surgery less than 24 hours after a traumatic cervical spine injury suffer less neural tissue destruction and improved clinical outcomes, according to a study published in PLoS One.

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  • Spinous process-splitting open pedicle screw fusion technique relieves lower back pain and discomfort in patients

    SourceOrthosupersite

    In patients suffering from degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinous process-splitting open pedicle screw fusion can relieve lower back pain, lower back discomfort and causes less paraspinal muscle injury than conventional open pedicle screw techniques, according to researchers from Japan.

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  • Spinal cord stimulation efficiency boosted with implanted device with three columns of electrodes

    SourceMedical News Today

    A study published in the March issue of Neurosurgery, the official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, describes a new method of electrical stimulation that uses an implanted device with three columns of electrodes, which could increase the efficiency of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for severe back pain.

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  • Best ways to reduce back pain at your desk job

    SourceFox News.com

    A number of studies have shown that sitting at your desk all day is not good for your overall health, but there’s been little proof that sitting for long hours leads to back pain.

    “One of the negative effects of sitting is that it puts the spine in a flexed position (bent forward) and this may cause your back muscles to stop working efficiently, putting your back at risk of injury,” said Donald R. Murphy, clinical assistant professor at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I.

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  • Lumbar disc degeneration more likely in obese adults

    SourceOrthospinenews

    An age related disability, known as degenerative disc disease, was recently found to be linked to obesity. As a person ages their spinal discs begin to break down and will result in loss of fluids or tears in the outer layers of the discs, all together eventually causing the degenerative disease. A recent study at the University of Hong Kong found that adults who are overweight or obese were significantly more likely to have disc degeneration than those with a normal body mass index (BMI).

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  • Epidural steroid injections do not improve outcomes in patients with lumbar stenosis

    SourceOrthosupersite

    A subgroup analysis of the SPORT study found that patients with spinal stenosis who received epidural steroid injections had significantly less improvement compared to those who did not receive them, despite whether patients were treated surgically or nonsurgically.

    The research, presented at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the North American Spine Society, also revealed that epidural steroid injected [ESI] patients showed no avoidance to surgery, had longer surgical times and hospital stays.

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  • Study investigates risks for re-operation after spondylolisthesis surgery

    SourceOrthosupersite

    A subgroup analysis of the SPORT study showed a 14% re-operation rate at 4 years for patients who undergo surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis and found no link between the risk of revision and traditional factors, such as surgical variables, body mass index and baseline clinical scores.

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  • Epidural steroid injection returns most professional football players to the field

    SourceOrthosupersite

    Researchers found an 89% success rate of epidural steroid injection treatment for acute lumbar disk herniation in professional football players, according to Aaron J. Krych, MD at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine 2012 Specialty Day Meeting, here.

    In our hands, epidural steroid injections were an effective therapeutic option for treatment of acute lumbar disk herniation in professional athletes,” Krych said. “They appear to be safe and well-tolerated with minimal side effects. In this small study, risk factors for failure included sequestered disk on MRI as well as presentation of lower extremity weakness. We continue to recommend an individualized treatment approach for our athletes.”

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